his madness keeps him sane

I like books, comics, geek culture, and punk rock music.

I do geeky stuff with flexpods for a job.

leannebenson:

So I’ve found another gig from 2004, I know I have some more, I’m having such a lovely time going through all these! Pre smoking ban. Good old days. This was at the Rhythm factory in Whitechapel (one of the many sweaty Libs gigs there).

leannebenson:

I’ve dug out some photographs of Pete Doherty and Babyshambles from 2004. This was a small last minute gig in a studio in Old Street, quite late one night. It was really squashed, really hot and smelly but it was f’ing brilliant. Though they were shot on a Canon 10d which, wasn’t full frame, I love these photographs dearly.

leannebenson:

I’ll keep posting these as I dig them out. This was from the Colour Bar in Camden in January 2004. It was last minute on a sunday night, really small space and squeezed in. If I remember rightly, the bar manager told them to wrap it up so they just kept merging one song into another so the last song was like another 20 minutes :) again was a f’ing brilliant night.

leannebenson:

2 more shots from the Camden gig. It was just Pete and Carl at this one.

"Who would you have as Lord of Winterfell, Snow?"
Jon said, “Winterfell belongs to my sister Sansa.”

(Source: sansasnark, via gameofthronesdaily)

thenetrunnerproject:

Cyberpunk is the subgenre of science fiction which asks, essentially, “what if we had the technology to solve all our problems, but we also still had capitalism?”
It posits glorious highs and crippling lows, but – crucially – there’s little that seems to require the lows. Once you start suggesting reasons for people struggling in poverty, you move out of cyberpunk and in to full blown dystopian fiction. Resource constraints, overpopulation, alien invasions: these are concepts foreign to cyberpunk.
Why are people having to scrabble to survive, in a world where two separate companies have invented ways to perfectly substitute human labour at essentially zero cost? Because capitalism. There’s no reason why anyone in the world of Netrunner should have to work to survive, when bioroid labour is perfectly capable of doing it for them. But if people stop working, Haas Bioroid stops making profit from them. And if Haas Bioroid stops making profit, it doesn’t need to make bioroids. And so the poor must exist so the rich can.
Of course, the ethical dilemmas in the creation of bioroids, and Jinteki’s clones, are also fairly cyberpunk – because, again, they involve the wanton disregard for the rights of a sentient being to satisfy the profit motive.
It’s to the credit of cyberpunk as a genre, and Netrunner as a specific case of it, that it so rarely gets depressing. Because the other major plank in the ethos is people fighting back.
But for me, Hedge Fund is the most depressing card of them all. Because what it says is that nothing will change. Even given the fact that Netrunner is, essentially, End Stage Capitalism: The Card Game, Hedge Fund is a reminder is that it’s set in a world in which the most iconic way to make a quick buck, after all these years, in a world with mining on the moon and clones in the household, is still, as ever, running a fucking Hedge Fund.

thenetrunnerproject:

Cyberpunk is the subgenre of science fiction which asks, essentially, “what if we had the technology to solve all our problems, but we also still had capitalism?”

It posits glorious highs and crippling lows, but – crucially – there’s little that seems to require the lows. Once you start suggesting reasons for people struggling in poverty, you move out of cyberpunk and in to full blown dystopian fiction. Resource constraints, overpopulation, alien invasions: these are concepts foreign to cyberpunk.

Why are people having to scrabble to survive, in a world where two separate companies have invented ways to perfectly substitute human labour at essentially zero cost? Because capitalism. There’s no reason why anyone in the world of Netrunner should have to work to survive, when bioroid labour is perfectly capable of doing it for them. But if people stop working, Haas Bioroid stops making profit from them. And if Haas Bioroid stops making profit, it doesn’t need to make bioroids. And so the poor must exist so the rich can.

Of course, the ethical dilemmas in the creation of bioroids, and Jinteki’s clones, are also fairly cyberpunk – because, again, they involve the wanton disregard for the rights of a sentient being to satisfy the profit motive.

It’s to the credit of cyberpunk as a genre, and Netrunner as a specific case of it, that it so rarely gets depressing. Because the other major plank in the ethos is people fighting back.

But for me, Hedge Fund is the most depressing card of them all. Because what it says is that nothing will change. Even given the fact that Netrunner is, essentially, End Stage Capitalism: The Card Game, Hedge Fund is a reminder is that it’s set in a world in which the most iconic way to make a quick buck, after all these years, in a world with mining on the moon and clones in the household, is still, as ever, running a fucking Hedge Fund.

(via kierongillen)

laughterkey:

literallysokka:

itsramez:

please be courteous this 4th. of July if you have a veteran in your neighborhood 

This is something very very important which I’ve never thought about until now

My dad used to have issues with mortar smoke - remember it’s not just the noise that can be a problem.

laughterkey:

literallysokka:

itsramez:

please be courteous this 4th. of July if you have a veteran in your neighborhood 

This is something very very important which I’ve never thought about until now

My dad used to have issues with mortar smoke - remember it’s not just the noise that can be a problem.

(via neil-gaiman)